Alternatives on media content, journalism, and regulation by edited by Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Benjamin De Cleen, NIco

By edited by Seeta Peña Gangadharan, Benjamin De Cleen, NIco Carpentier.

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The social networks required to distribute print journals, networks which generally then formed the backbone of social movement organizations, are not necessary. 3. There is no limit to what can be said. The gatekeeper function inherent in the printed word, which empowered so many movement leaders, has vanished. 4. The electronic word is limitless. The problem of who gets to speak and for how long has been solved. But the solution poses its own problem: with everyone speaking, who has time to listen?

Accumulating momentum very gradually in the 1950s and early 1960s, it suddenly exploded into a mass movement when its trickle of activists flowed into the mighty river of 1960’s radicalism. This momentum lasted well into the 1970s, creating a golden age of “gay liberation” when breathtaking victories were won in a stunningly short period of time. The movement then began to disintegrate, until the AIDS epidemic forced the community back into political mobilization. The GI movement is even more narrowly bounded by the period of US military intervention in Vietnam.

In fact, it rarely had news at all in the conventional meaning of the term. It consistently lost money, and had only three thousand subscribers at its peak, yet it remains one of the most influential newspapers in US history. Its demand for immediate, as opposed to 32 Alternatives on media content, journalism, and regulation gradual, emancipation moved from the outer fringe to the core of the abolitionist movement, and then to national policy with the Emancipation Proclamation. Its uncompromising voice spread well beyond abolitionists to inspire and inform early women’s rights activists and many others.

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